Compassion

March 13, 2018

““God is more compassionate and understanding toward us than we sometimes are toward ourselves.” (Foundation Study Bible, 1 John 3:20)

 

“Even though we have put our faith in Christ and committed ourselves to obeying His will, this doesn’t automatically guarantee total and perpetual immunity from trouble. There will be seasons when God seems remote and we begin to wonder about God’s unfailing love. It is in these times that we must hold most firmly to what we know about God, rather than what we feel. God has neither forgotten to show mercy nor stifled His compassion.” (Foundation Study Bible, Psalms 77:7-8)

 

“No one is as good and compassionate as God, but even He does not forgive the unrepentant…we believe God loves us above all else and He views our sins, areas that we fall short, with compassion; but we must have a repentant heart that is open to receiving God’s compassion.” (St. Mark the Ascetic, Sacramental Living)

 

“When dealing with people, it is more important to love and understand them than to analyze them or give advice. Compassion produces greater results than criticism or blame…Each time we show compassion, our character is strengthened.” (Life Application Study Bible, Job 26:2-4, 2 Samuel 9:7)

 

“Compassion is a fruit of righteousness. Thus in man's dominion over every living thing, he is to express this dominion in compassion…the humble soul is filled with compassion, kindliness, and mercy.” (Orthodox Study Bible, Proverbs 12:10, Dynamis 1/29/2015) 

 

"The word compassion comes from two Latin words, cum and passio. Cum is defined as “with” and passio means “to suffer.” Thus, compassion means “to suffer with.” It says in the Bible that when we follow Christ, there will be suffering because we live in a fallen world. As we go forth, tell the truth, and help people in need, we are going to experience a level of suffering . . . and this is where God is found.” (David Kinnaman & Gabe Lyons)

 

“The consumer world does not suffer well. It has substituted an ethic of false compassion, defined as the relief of pain (not the “sharing of suffering,” its original meaning). Consumerist compassion is stymied when confronted with suffering. That which cannot be relieved must be eliminated. We anesthesize, abort, and euthanize, all in the name of compassion. We do not withstand and endure. Consumption is turned towards the self. Within the self alone, suffering can have no meaning. In the name of compassion, we kill, thinking that death ends suffering. It is an act of despair.” (Father Stephen Freeman)

 

“Compassion differs from empathy. The critical element in compassion that differentiates it from empathy is its behavioral component. Empathy is thinking and feeling what others are thinking and feeling. Compassion combines the deep awareness of the sufferings of others with a desire that leads, eventually, to an action to relieve the suffering.” (Father George Morelli)

 

“Compassion binds us especially to the suffering of others so that we share their suffering vicariously and want to do something to alleviate it.” (Vigen Guroian)

 

“We must not be so self-consumed as to have no compassion for others….A compassionate heart leads to God as it places others above self.” (Abbot Tryphon)

 

“Too often we focus on God as Judge and Lawgiver, ignoring his compassion and concern for us. When God examines our lives, He remembers our human condition.” (Life Application Study Bible, Psalms 103:13-14)

 

“God is more compassionate and understanding toward us than we sometimes are toward ourselves.” (Foundation Study Bible, 1 John 3:20)

 

“God’s compassion is a compassion that reveals itself in servanthood." (Donald McNeill, Douglas Morrison, and Henri Nouwen)

 

“Ever let mercy outweigh all else in you. Let our compassion be a mirror where we may see in ourselves that likeness and that true image which belong to the Divine nature and Divine essence. A heart hard and unmerciful will never be pure.” (St. Isaac the Syrian)

 

"The closer we grow in relationship with Christ, the greater our ability to exhibit the likeness or divine attributes of God, in essence what God wants us to become: good, loving, merciful, compassionate, long-suffering, patient, pure, and having pure love for neighbor.” (Deacon and Fellow Pilgrim)

 

“Jesus does not condemn sinners, but sees them as lost sheep to be found and brought home. Compassion means “suffering with.” (Orthodox Study Bible, Matthew 9:36)

 

 “…godly compassion remains the primary path that every member of the Church should follow…We are to let our compassion be evident in our actions toward all.” (Dynamis 6/23/2014)

 

“As Christians, our understanding of justice is not a forceful or violent condemnation of our world and our fellow human beings. Ours is a justice of compassion that seeks to reconcile each and every person to God by means of the transforming love he has revealed to us.” (Archbishop Demetrios of America)

 

 “To be grounded more in mercy and compassion than judgment, while at the same time not losing our ability to judge and discern a situation, it is useful to frame in our minds how we think of and convey our thoughts on right and wrong…right means good for you and wrong means bad for you.” It’s really that simple.” (Sacramental Living II)

 

 “All of you be of one mind, having compassion for one another, love as brothers, be tenderhearted, be courteous; not returning evil for evil or reviling for reviling, but on the contrary blessing, knowing that you were called to this, that you may inherit a blessing” (Saint Peter).  

 

“The true saint is not one who has become convinced that he himself is holy, but one who is overwhelmed by the realization that God, and God alone, is holy. He is so awestruck with the reality of the divine holiness that he begins to see it everywhere...The saint is capable, as [Russian novelist] Dostoevski said, of loving others even in their sin. For what he sees in all things and in all men is the object of the divine compassion." (Thomas Merton)

 

“In the actions and words of Christ it is evident that the peace of God is the gift and blessing of the grace of God and His love for humankind. It is a peace that comes from the assurances of a divine and compassionate presence, a peace that offers a level of security and joy that can come from no other source in heaven or on earth.” (Archbishop Demetrios of America)

 

“Many espouse punishments for people but don’t talk about compassion and redemption. Christ loved with a perfect love even seeking the forgiveness of those that crucified Him. This is an attitude we need to emulate in how we view ourselves and our failings and how we view others.” (Joseph Girzone, Sacramental Living)

 

“…it is these qualities of reverence of God, humility and compassion that are the first steps to the path of wisdom and we must learn them before we can learn the rules of logic and critical thinking.” (Father  Patrick Henry Reardon)  

 

“As Christians we do not need to compromise what we believe but we do need to do our best to understand others, see God’s image and likeness in them no matter what they think, and treat them respectfully and compassionately even if we oppose what they think. Tolerance, despite its modern connotation, does not mean accepting what we believe is wrong or capitulation. It does mean respect and compassion which is far easier to do and feel if we understand other people.” (Sacramental Living)

 

 “Our compassionate Lord understands that we need the tangible. He became incarnate to awaken us to the possibility of His physical presence in many tangible forms. After withdrawing His body to heaven, He sends the Holy Spirit into our hearts…”(Dynamis 12/4/2015)

 

 “Fortunately, God’s compassion and mercy toward us are not limited by our faithfulness to Him.” (Life Application Study Bible, Psalms 106:44-46)

 

 “If we remain attentive to what drives our actions, we will notice the true aim of our hearts. Let us ask ourselves, ‘How is my heart leading me? Do my actions awaken my heart to Christ, and to compassion for others as well?’ ” (Dynamis 11/4/2014)

 

 “When it comes to applying that love to others, one of the most important aspects is compassion...The best way to be able to truly and fully love and have compassion for someone else is to place yourself in their situation. If someone is hurting, all you have to do is ask yourself, what would it be like if that was me? How would I feel if it was me in that situation? By placing yourself in their situation, you can get a glimpse of what they are feeling, and be moved to take action to help them if you can.” (Richard A. Grumberg)

 

 “Through suffering, Jesus completed the work necessary for our own salvation. Our suffering can make us more sensi