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Repentance


“The word for "confess" in Greek (ἐξομολογοῦμαι, ὁμολογῶ) does not bear the contemporary meaning peculiar to it. When we say "confess" we imply that we accept, recognize or witness an event or fact. But this is not the original meaning. The point is not of admitting, more or less reluctantly, a hitherto "unrecognized" sin, but an acceptance of and submission to the divine Logos (exomologesis) beyond and above the nature and condition of man. It is this Logos, the Word of God, that man seeks to regain, or rather to commune with. To confess is not so much to recognize and expose a failure as to go forward and upward, to respond from within to the calling of God. Created in the image and likeness of God, man bears before himself and in himself that image and likeness. In repenting he does not so much look forward as reflects and reacts to what lies before and beyond him.” (Greek Orthodox Archdiocese)

“Repentance in deep mourning and joined with confession is what unveils the eyes of the soul to see the great things of God.” (Metropolitan Hierotheos Vlachos)

“Saul seems to repent, yet God does not accept his confession as He did that of David after David's sin. St. Augustine notes that mere outward confession of sin is not what God desires, but an inward change of heart. One only has to look at the lives of Saul and David to see that one truly repented and the other did not.” (Orthodox Study Bible 1 Kingdoms (1 Samuel) 15:24-26)

“Repentance is not to be confused with mere remorse, with a self-regarding feeling of being sorry for a wrong done. It is not a state but a stage, a beginning. Rather, it is an invitation to new life, an opening up of new horizons, the gaining of a new vision. Christianity testifies that the past can be undone. It knows the mystery of obliterating or rather renewing memory, of forgiveness and regeneration, eschewing the fixed division between the "good" and the "wicked," the pious and the rebellious, the believers and the unbelievers. Indeed, "the last" can be "the first," the sinner can reach out to holiness.” (Greek Orthodox Archdiocese)

“Confession takes two forms. According to the one, we give thanks for blessings received; according to the other, we bring to light and examine what we have done wrong. We use the term confession both for the grateful appreciation of the blessings we have received through divine favor, and for the admission of the evil actions of which we are guilty. Both forms produce humility.” (St. Maximos the Confessor)

“Feeling sorry is not enough. Heartfelt, godly sorrow produces repentance and diligence (2 Corinthians 7:11). True repentance cleanses us from sin and alienation, and diligence zealously pursues holiness and reconciliation.” (Orthodox Study Bible, 2 Corinthians 7:9-11)

“Confession takes two forms. According to the one, we give thanks for blessings received; according to the other, we bring to light and examine what we have done wrong. We use the term confession both for the grateful appreciation of the blessings we have received through divine favor, and for the admission of the evil actions of which we are guilty. Both forms produce humility.” (St. Maximos the Confessor)

“We must repent for our imperfections, for our state of being. Here it is important to make a distinction between repentance and contrition. Repentance refers more to a specific fault that we have committed, while contrition is a permanent state. Contrition needs to be the default state of our souls.” (Elder Sergei of Vanves)

“Repentance means changing direction, and results in spiritual deliverance.” (Foundation Study Bible,)

“In our world where everything is about promoting yourself, repentance feels brutal. But repentance is the only way to be healed.” (Pastor Timothy Keller)

Repentance means “a change of direction,” and “a recognition that one has missed the mark.” Repentance, for each of us, is realizing where we are missing the mark, in relation to where we are, versus where God tells us to be.” (Fr. Stavros N. Akrotirianakis)

“Repentance in deep mourning and joined with confession is what unveils the eyes of the soul to see the great things of God.” (Metropolitan Hierotheos Vlachos)

“Human beings spend most of their lives “donning various masks” to hide their weaknesses, fears, insecurities, and shame. Repentance is simply the act of taking off the masks.” (Jonathan Jackson)

“Repentance always bring blessings from the Lord…through repentance, life that was merely existence is transformed into real living—that is, living in faith, love, joy, and confident hope.” (Orthodox Study Bible, Acts 3:26)

“Repentance is the renewal of baptism.” (St. John Climacus)

“The mind here [Romans 8:5-8] is far more than intellectual capacity. It is the highest knowing faculty of the soul (Gr. nous), the spirit and understanding behind all we think and do. Thus, it follows that repentance literally means to have a “change of mind,” a change not only of intellect but of all our being.” (Orthodox Study Bible, Romans 8:5-8)

“Repentance has little to do with regret and everything to do with a transformed way of thinking.” (Father Barnabas Powell)

“Repentance means changing direction, from the direction that takes us away from Christ, to the direction that takes us toward Him. Repentance is the key that opens the door to salvation...Repentance is the path to knowledge of God and salvation.” (Fr. Stavros N. Akrotirianakis, Father Stephen Freeman)

“In our struggle on the path to God, repentance must be the central theme. Only in repentance do we find the true meaning of life, for only in repentance can we enter into communion with God." (Abbot Tryphon)

"A life of repentance never abandons Christ the Physician, though it may fall every hour, but constantly turns back to the Lord in prayer and humbles itself amidst its sins, sorrows, and misfortunes." (Archimandrite Sergius)

“The gap between what is and what should be is called sin. For sin is not only “missing the mark,” and doing the wrong thing, sin is failure to do the right thing. Indifference, for example, is a sin. The way for closing that gap is called repentance.” (Fr. Stavros N. Akrotirianakis)

“…not even our sins can make God angry — He loves us with an everlasting love. We will be judged not according to our sins, but whether or not we responded in humility and repentance…Greater love has no one than this, than to lay down one’s life for his friends” (John 15:13). This is the love that will judge us all.” (Father Barnabas Powell)

“Let our first concern be that we do not sin—and the second not to condemn." (Elder Efstratios of Glinsk)

"Let us always keep this double character of repentance in mind: on the one hand, it means to grieve and mourn for our sins and shortcomings; on the other, it finds comfort and joy in God’s mercy and love." (Archimandrite Vassilios Papavassiliou)

“God never rejects those who sincerely turn to Him. God was warning his people to repent before it became impossible to change [Jeremiah 13]. We must never put off until tomorrow those changes God wants us to make. Our attitudes and patterns for living can become so set that we will lose all desire to change and will no longer fear the consequences.” (Life Application Study Bible, Jeremiah 13:23)

“Like Judas, the ugodly have a sense of regret, but not repentance…” (Orthodox Study Bible, Wisdom of Solomon 5:5-6)

“Jesus’ call to repent was more than merely a call to feel remorse or regret for our sins; it was a call to change our minds, to exchange our agenda for his; it was a call to reorder our lives in the face of God’s dramatic news that his kingdom was now available to all.” (Richard Stearns)

“[Repentance] means unlearning all the self-conceit and self-will that we have been training ourselves into... It means killing part of yourself, under-going a kind of death.” (C. S. Lewis)

"Repentance lies at the very heart of Christian life. The preaching of our Lord Himself began with repentance: “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand” (Matt. 4:17)." (Archimandrite

Vassilios Papavassiliou)

“Repentance is not really a gloomy affair, or should not be. It is really an acknowledgement that we are sick in a sense – not physically sick but spiritually sick, and need the great physician, Christ. Sin has damaged our will, or our ability to choose rightly all of the time. God condescended to us in Christ, and continues through the Holy Spirit to save us. Part of our continued participation in the salvation He offers us is through repentance. The problem today is because our will is damaged many people don’t think they are sick and in need of salvation and thus don’t understand the importance of true heartfelt repentance.” (Sacramental Living Podcast)

“Then Cain said to the Lord. ‘My guilt is too great to be forgiven!’…Cain used his guilt as an excuse to avoid repentance, for he did not believe in the grace of God.” (Orthodox Study Bible,

Genesis 4:13)

“‘Then Cain went out from the presence of the Lord and dwelt in the Land of Nod opposite of Eden.’ The name Nod means “one who wanders away from God.” Such was Cain’s state…Judas wandered from God too. Both men seemed to have remorse and guilt but were too self-consumed to wander back to God by repenting and seeking forgiveness.” (Orthodox Study Bible, Genesis 4:16, Sacramental Living Blog)

“In clinging to our guilt, we act as though there were no forgiveness. Clinging to guilt is not a sign of humility but rather a sign of unbelief, for we turn a cold shoulder to the very forgiveness that has been pronounced, as though it were not true.” (Abbott Tryphon)

“God is ever ready to forgive us when we confess our sins and truly repent. Among the Lord Jesus’ disciples, the repentance of Saint Peter confirms the ever-present possibility of forgiveness and restoration. By contrast, the dark, tragic example of Judas reminds us of what happens if we fail to seek forgiveness and change our values, but turn instead to self-destruction (Mt 27:3-5).” (OCPM 3/2/2016)

“Although repentance is manifested in human actions, the inclination to repent and the inner power to change come from God by grace. Indeed, Christ is the true source of our repentance.Every heartfelt impulse to confess, to weep for our sins, to struggle against them, or to live virtuously is a gift from God.” (Dynamis 4/25/2015)

#RichardStearns #CSLewis #ArchimandriteVassiliosPapavassiliou #SacramentalLivingPodcast #SacramentalLivingBlog #FrStavrosNAkrotirianakis #FatherBarnabasPowelll #ElderEfstratiosofGlinsk #FatherStephenFreeman #AbbotTryphon #ArchimandriteSergius #MetropolitanHierotheosVlachos #JonathanJackson #OrthodoxStudyBible #StJohnClimacus #StMaximostheConfessor #ElderSergeiofVanves #FoundationStudyBible #PastorTimothyKeller #GreekOrthodoxArchdiocese

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