Sober and Sobriety

August 5, 2019

“ [Therefore gird up the loins of your mind, be sober, and rest your hope fully upon the grace that is to be brought to you at the revelation of Jesus Christ]. be sober. Peter’s concern here is primarily using mentally or spiritually sound judgment.” (Foundation Study Bible, 1 Peter 1:13)

 

“The rational mind champions argument and judgment (it was always meant to measure, weigh and compare). But the rational mind was never intended to be the seat of the soul. That belongs to the nous. And it is only in the sobriety of noetic comprehension that the truth of the faith yields itself up as the life-giving Word of God. Only the sobriety of noetic perception is able to wield the fiery coal of the Divine revelation in such a way that it heals and doesn’t destroy… Rightness of heart is what a true noetic understanding and sobriety (nepsis) of spirit are about.” (Father Stephen Freeman)

 

“…watchfulness and readiness do not mean a wearisome, spiritless performance of formal and empty obligations. Most certainly it does not mean inactivity and slothfulness. Watchfulness signifies inner stability, soberness, tranquility and joy. It means spiritual alertness, attentiveness and vigilance. Watchfulness is the deep personal resolve to find and do the will of God, embrace every commandment and every virtue, and guard the intellect and heart from evil thoughts and actions. Watchfulness is the intense love of God.” (Rev. Alkiviadis Calivas)

 

“[St. Paul] calls us to be watchful, for those “who are of the day” should live soberly (1 Thessalonians 5:8). In modern times, any talk of sobriety raises the specter of substance abuse...No doubt addiction and drunkenness were as prevalent in first-century Greco-Roman society as they are today. Yet the Apostle Paul does not focus primarily on this issue per se, but assigns a broader meaning to the term sobriety. He stresses our need to be conscious of our ultimate accountability before God. Christian sobriety thus embraces not only the specific problem of substance abuse, but also irresponsibility, loss of direction, and hopelessness.” (OCPM 11/12/2015)

 

“A sober life is not only free from drunkenness, but awake to spiritual realities…Sobriety, then, is our antidote to the casual, moment-to-moment indulgence that will strip our life of eternal meaning if we are not careful.” (Foundation Study Bible, 1 Thessalonians 5:8, OCPM 11/12/2015)

 

“[St. Paul] calls us to be watchful, for those" who are of the day” should live soberly (1 Thessalonians 5:8). In modern times, any talk of sobriety raises the specter of substance abuse...No doubt addiction and drunkenness were as prevalent in first-century Greco-Roman society as they are today. Yet the Apostle Paul does not focus primarily on this issue per se, but assigns a broader meaning to the term sobriety. He stresses our need to be conscious of our ultimate accountability before God. Christian sobriety thus embraces not only the specific problem of substance abuse, but also irresponsibility, loss of direction, and hopelessness.” (OCPM 11/12/2015)

 

“A sober life is not only free from drunkenness, but awake to spiritual realities.” (Foundation Study Bible, 1 Thessalonians 5:8)

 

"Sobriety, then, is our antidote to the casual, moment-to-moment indulgence that will strip our life of eternal meaning if we are not careful.” (OCPM 11/12/2015)

 

“Thinking more highly of ourselves than we ought to think is called pride. Thinking less highly of ourselves than we ought to think is false humility. Thinking about ourselves soberly is true humility. The key to reaching this sober state centers on the fact that our sense of worth stems from Christ’s saving action. We are not totally worthless because Christ died for us. Yet narcissistic tendencies in society are strong indicators that we aren’t living soberly.” (Tom Papagiannis, LCSW)

 

“The purpose of prayer is to be sober-minded and be with God.” (Sacramental Living)

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