QUOTE OF THE DAY

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  • Michael Haldas

Mystery


“God is beyond and above the entire creation, the greatest mystery of all mysteries, yet He is at the same time everywhere present and fills all things.” (Metropolitan Kallistos Ware)

“God is a mystery to all beings. God is in us, and that is why we are a mystery to our own selves. God reveals Himself only to the meek and humble. He is present everywhere, and He is a mystery. We may learn a little about Him, or may gather some knowledge from nature, but for the most part, we are surrounded by mystery.” (Elder Thaddeus of Vitovnica)

“It is a common mistake to treat the New Testament itself as the revelation of God, or the collection of the information newly revealed through Christ. We historicize Christ’s work as a set of teachings, an assemblage of theological information that we may now discuss, dissect and comprehend, rendering into nothing more than religion. However, the New Testament (and the fullness of the Church) have the mystery within them, and must be encountered first as mystery before they can be acquired as knowledge.” (Father Stephen Freeman)

“The mystery of the Church should not be considered as something which is simply unknown, such as who committed the murder in a detective novel, but as something which, even though we may know parts of it and have some partial understanding, is in its fullness unknowable – beyond the powers of the human mind to grasp. This does not downplay the role of human knowledge and understanding but simply recognizes its limitations…In the proper religious sense of the term, “mystery” signifies not only hiddenness but disclosure...“in the Christian context, we do not mean by “mystery” merely that which is baffling and mysterious, an enigma or insoluble problem. A mystery is, on the contrary, something that is revealed for our understanding, but which we can never understand exhaustively…(Archpriest Lawrence Cross, Metropolitan Kallistos Ware)

“In Christianity, mystery is not something to be solved. It’s not a great puzzle we need to figure out. Rather, it is something to be lived. We live the life the Church teaches us to live and mystery becomes something revealed to our hearts through our ever deepening encounter and relationship with God. Thus we acquire true knowledge through continual revelation.” (Sacramental Living Ministries)

"In popular usage, the word mystery has become synonymous with puzzle. Thus a mystery is something we do not know, but something that, with careful investigation is likely to be revealed. In the Church, mystery is something which by its very nature is unknown, and can only be known in a manner unlike anything else.” (Father Stephen Freeman)

“...imagination is a power of perception, a light that illumines the mystery that is hidden beneath visible reality: it is a power to help “see” into the very nature of things.” (Vigen Guroian)

“...the process by which a human being attains full maturity includes not only psychological development and moral growth but religious conversion, and, finally, mystical participation in the Divine Life.” (George MacDonald)

“Protect your childlike ability to wonder and stand in amazement—be open to mystery. Today, let the power of the disciplines of the Faith open your heart to true adoration. Let’s worship the Holy Trinity.” (Father Barnabas Powell)

“Man is the creature with a mystery in his heart that is bigger than himself.” (Hans Urs von Balthasar)

“In the proper religious sense of the term, “mystery” signifies not only hiddenness but disclosure...“in the Christian context, we do not mean by “mystery” merely that which is baffling and mysterious, an enigma or insoluble problem. A mystery is, on the contrary, something that is revealed for our understanding, but which we can never understand exhaustively…” (Metropolitan Kallistos Ware)

“The mystery of the Church should not be considered as something which is simply unknown, such as who committed the murder in a detective novel, but as something which, even though we may know parts of it and have some partial understanding, is in its fullness unknowable – beyond the powers of the human mind to grasp. This does not downplay the role of human knowledge and understanding but simply recognizes its limitations." (Archpriest Lawrence Cross)

“The mysteries of God are not information to be acquired: they are saving knowledge. Thus, when we draw near to the question of the final disposition of all things, we rightly regard it as a mystery. It is a mystery that we are, in fact, encouraged to enter. The mystery is not there simply to say, “None of your business.” (Father Stephen Freeman)

“God will not prevent us from tossing aside the claims and the presence of the Lord Jesus in our lives. He allows us full freedom to set up our standards of evaluation – to reduce the size of the playing field, if you will, in order to prove what pleases us. The end result is a life based on materialism, self-indulgence, and the passions. If God becomes merely another hypothesis, where do we find the mystery that fulfills life?” (Dynamis 4/27/2014)

“Our culture has filled our heads but emptied our hearts, stuffed our wallets but starved our wonder. It has fed our thirst for facts but not for meaning or mystery. It produces "nice" people, not heroes.” (Peter Kreeft)

“We must experience life as Job did—one day at a time and without complete answers to all of life’s questions. Will we, like Job, trust God no matter what? Or will we give in to the temptation to say that God doesn’t really care?” (Life Application Study Bible, Job 1:1)

“What defines this consensus, above all—what distinguishes orthodoxy from heresy, the central river from the delta—is a commitment to mystery and paradox. Mysteries abide at the heart of every religious faith, but the Christian tradition is uniquely comfortable preaching dogmas that can seem like riddles, offering answers that swiftly lead to further questions, and confronting believers with the possibility that the truth about God passes all our understanding.” (Ross Douthat)

“Christians themselves have been much to blame for the misunderstanding on these matters. They have a bad habit of talking as if revelation existed to gratify curiosity by illuminating all creation so that it becomes self-explanatory and all questions are answered.” (C. S. Lewis)

“At times we humans playfully indulge in deep questions or dawdle in idle speculation. Some of us devote weeks and months to profound soul-searching, reading and discussing the great issues. However, it is suffering which forces us to meditate on issues of ultimate meaning. Pain thrusts questions into our consciousness concerning the purpose of life, the nature of God, and our relationship with Him.” (OCPM 6/20/2016)

“The enormous size of the universe and the insignificance of the earth were known for centuries, and no one ever dreamed that they had any bearing on the religious question. Then, less than a hundred years ago, they are suddenly trotted out as an argument against Christianity. And the people who trot them out carefully hush up the fact that they were known long ago.” (C. S. Lewis)

“....it is not the task of Christianity to provide easy answers for every question, but to progressively make us aware of mystery. God is not so much the object of our knowledge as He is the cause of our awe.” (Metropolitan Kallistos Ware, Albert S. Rossi)

“Mystery is not magic. Mystery is the gracious movement of the Holy Spirit..." (Father Wilbur Ellsworth)

"I’m tired of playing by that dull and pedestrian set of rules, which has everything to do with a litigious, factoid-hungry culture and nothing to do with following Jesus. I don’t come to church for evidence or for a closing argument. I come to experience the presence of God, to sense the mystery of things eternal, and to learn a way of life that makes no sense to those stuck sniffing around for proof.” (Lillian Daniel)

"Perhaps the single greatest genius of…Christian spirituality is the ability to live in the"both/and” which is another way of saying,"mystery"...To live in the"both/and” means to live in the intersection of apparent paradox or at the very least complementarity. It is accepting the reality that something can be this and that all at the same time and not insisting that it be either/or. The predominantly scientific-rationalist worldview of western civilization has a very difficult time understanding and embracing this reality. Yet it is the one thing that modern society yearns for although we do not always realize it.” (Father Thomas Loya)

"In theology we use our reasoning brain, because that is a gift from God. But always we recognize that in theology we are working on something that lies beyond our reasoning brain, because it is mystery." (Metropolitan Kallistos Ware)

#MetropolitanKallistosWareAlbertSRossi #FatherWilburEllsworth #LillianDaniel #MetropolitanKallistosWare #ArchpriestLawrenceCross #PeterKreeft #RossDouthat #CSLewis #FatherStephenFreeman #VigenGuroian #GeorgeMacDonald #FatherBarnabasPowelll #HansUrsvonBalthasar #ElderThaddeusofVitovnica #SacramentalLivingMinistries